Archive for the ‘Journalism/communications’ Category

When Illness Goes Public: Celebrity Patients and How We Look at Medicine

May 1, 2007

From the book jacket:

Steve McQueen had cancer and was keeping it secret. Then the media found out, and soon all of America knew. McQueen’s high profile changed forever the way the public perceived a dreaded disease.

In When Illness Goes Public, Barron H. Lerner describes the evolution of celebrities’ illnesses from private matters to stories of great public interest. Famous people who have become symbols of illness include Lou Gehrig, the first “celebrity patient”; Rita Hayworth, whose Alzheimer disease went undiagnosed for years; and Arthur Ashe, who courageously went public with his AIDS diagnosis before the media could reveal his secret. And then there are private citizens like Barney Clark, the first recipient of a permanent artificial heart, and Lorenzo Odone, whose neurological disorder became the subject of a Hollywood film.

While celebrity illnesses have helped to inform patients about treatment options, ethical controversies, and scientific proof, the stories surrounding these illnesses have also assumed mythical characteristics that may be misleading. Marrying great storytelling to an exploration of the intersection of science, journalism, fame, and legend, this book is a groundbreaking contribution to our understanding of health and illness.

To view library holding’s information, click here.

How people work: and how you can help them to give their best.

April 2, 2007

From the book jacket:

People want to do many things. We want to feel that the work we do is worthwhile and that we make a difference. We want to feel valued, forge meaningful relationships and encounter energizing challenges. For managers, the key to unlocking motivation and performance is somehow to match the things you want to get done with things your people want to do.

If roles are interesting, stimulating and satisfying then people are likely to want to do them; maybe not all the time, but consistently enough to be able to say “I enjoy your work.” If on the other hand managers allow jobs to become boring, stultifying and disappointing they close the door on excellence before it has the chance to develop because no-one can put their talents and energy for very long into something they really don’t want to do.

Excellent individual performance has to be facilitated. Facilitated by the right organizational setting, and facilitated by the right management to ensure that their people are allowed to give their best.

The way work is organized and the way people are encouraged to carry it out can make or break excellent performance, and certain characteristics of the work environment are consistently associated with successful outcomes. This book explores the dynamics that influence a great working environment, and sets out the management tools to nurture deeper commitment and better performance.

It will be your field-guide to understanding how people work and how you can help them to achieve more.

For holding information, click here.

Veiled Sentiments

March 19, 2007

From the book jacket:

Lila Abu-Lughod lived with a community of Bedouins in the Western Desert of Egypt for nearly two years, studying gender relations and the oral lyric poetry through which women and young men express personal feelings. The poems are haunting, the evocation of emotional life vivid. But her analysis also reveals how deeply implicated poetry and sentiment are in the play of power and the maintenance of a system of social hiearchy. What begins as a puzzle about a single poetic genre becomes a reflection on the politics of sentiment and the relationship between ideology and human experience. 

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Raising children who think for themselves

February 26, 2007

From the book jacket:

Raising Children who Think for Themselves offers a new approach to parenting that has the power to reverse the trend of external direction in our children and help parents bring up empathetic, self-confident, moral, independent thinkers. Children who are externally directed make decisions based on peer groups, violent movies, sexually explicit television shows, and rap lyrics that permeate their lives. When children are self-directed, on the other hand, they use their power of reason like a sword to cut through the jungle of external influences. Fortunately the author shows us, it is never too late to foster in our children the ability to weigh options, consider sources, and think for themselves.

To view holdings information click here.

 

You’re Wearing That?

February 26, 2007

From the book jacket:

Deborah Tannen’s #1 New York Times bestseller You Just Don’t Understand revolutionized communication between women and men. Now, in her most provocative and engaging book to date, she takes on what is potentially the most fraught and passionate connection of women’s lives: the mother-daughter relationship.
It was Tannen who first showed us that men and women speak different languages. Mothers and daughters speak the same language–but still often misunderstand each other, as they struggle to find the right balance between closeness and independence. Both mothers and daughters want to be seen for who they are, but tend to see the other as falling short of who she should be. Each overestimates the other’s power and underestimates her own.

Why do daughters complain that their mothers always criticize, while mothers feel hurt that their daughters shut them out? Why do mothers and daughters critique each other on the Big Three–hair, clothes, and weight–while longing for approval and understanding? And why do they scrutinize each other for reflections of themselves?
Deborah Tannen answers these and many other questions as she explains why a remark that would be harmless coming from anyone else can cause an explosion when it comes from your mother or your daughter. She examines every aspect of this complex dynamic, from the dark side that can shadow a woman throughout her life, to the new technologies like e-mail and instant messaging that are transforming mother-daughter communication. Most important, she helps mothers and daughters understand each other, the key to improving their relationship.

With groundbreaking insights, pitch-perfect dialogues, and deeply moving memories of her own mother, Tannen untangles the knots daughters and mothers can get tied up in. Readers will appreciate Tannen’s humor as they see themselves on every page and come away with real hope for breaking down barriers and opening new lines of communication. Eye-opening and heartfelt, You’re Wearing That? illuminates and enriches one of the most important relationships in our lives.

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Presenting to Win: The Art of Telling Your Story

February 6, 2007

presenting

From the book jacket: In Presenting to Win: Persuading Your Audience Every Time, the world’s #1 presentation consultant shows how to connect with even the toughest, most high-level audiences–and move them to action. Jerry Weissman shows presenters of all kinds how to dump those PowerPoint templates once and for all–and learn to tell compelling stories that focus on what’s in it for their listeners. Drawing on dozens of practical examples and real case studies, Weissman shows presenters how to identify their real goals and messages before they even open PowerPoint; how to stay focused on what their listeners really care about; and how to capture their audiences in the first crucial 90 seconds. From bullets and graphics to the effective, sparing use of special effects, Weissman covers all the practical mechanics of effective presentation–and walks readers through every step of building a Power Presentation, from brainstorming through delivery. Unlike the techniques in other presentation books, this book’s easy, step-by-step approach has been proven with billions of dollars on the line, in hundreds of IPO road shows before the world’s most jaded investors.

To view holdings information click here.

Thinking for Yourself

January 30, 2007

 

thinking

From the book jacket: An excellent book that covers such diverse subjects as critical thinking, observation skills, word usage, communication, facts and reality, inferences, assumptions, opinions, viewpoints, arguments, fallacies, inductive and deductive reasoning, research skills and problem solving. And within each subject is a very well defined and easily understood definition of that subject along with examples of each. The chapter quiz found at the end of each chapter helps to ingrain and reinforce the lesson. The book is insightful and well written. Done with great skill as one is actually able to understand the premise and meaning of each topic/lesson.

To view holdings information for this book click here.